Marijuana Essays

In: Custom essay samples

Marijuana Essays

Marijuana essays are one of the most frequently assigned topics.  A lot of articles have been written about marijuana and the need to ban or legalize it. This page contains a short sample marijuana essay about the policy challenges regarding marijuana addiction.  You may also find useful writing tips in our free essay writing blog. If you are in need of professional help with writing your marijuana essay, we are open 24/7 to assist you with writing. Our custom essay writing services are affordable and we do not ignore your requests! Essay writing service we provide is professional, on time, and legit! Moreover, you may review free custom essay samples in our blog and learn how to write great essays!

Marijuana Essays Sample

The range of possible alternatives to current policies regarding the various behaviors considered in this essay is substantial, and the issues pertaining to them are complex and variable. The problems posed by state-organized gambling are different from those presented by licensed prostitution; those involved in a scheme for government regulation of marijuana distribution undoubtedly differ from those present in programs of methadone or heroin-maintenance for opiate addicts. It is not possible to include in this brief discussion detailed consideration of the pros and cons of such specific policy options. Yet the question of alternative policies suggests several general points that often have been obscured and that require at least brief comment here. The first concerns the frequently implied necessity of specifying a precise alternative.

Such necessity is not at all self-evident. As Packer has suggested, "The real alternative in many cases will turn out to be doing nothing (as a matter of legal compulsion), or at any rate doing less. No body would argue that decriminalization is a panacea. Experience in jurisdictions that have legislated one or another victimless crime out of existence makes it quite clear that such a step does not completely and smoothly eliminate perceived social problems overnight. Legal proscription is so intimately related to more general patterns of social disapproval that certain potential effects of decriminalization can only be determined through long-term comparative analysis. Other short-term effects (including possible lessening of secondary harms) may be more readily apparent. However, we have virtually no evidence at all to support the claims one sometimes encounters to the effect that dire consequences are bound to follow decriminalization. Typically, of course, such claims do involve long-term projections. Yet, as Geis recently noted, all too often there has been "the implicit assumption that failure to continue existing proscription of morally condemned behavior is apt to produce only untoward results. Actually, the results are apt to be of many different kinds, and a true measure of their totality almost an impossible task."

These comments may suggest a further point—one that is of particular significance. In our discussion so far, no explicit effort has been made to specify where the burden of argument and evidence ought to lie regarding the substance of the criminal law. As we have seen, there may be a strong case for believing that the provisions considered here do more harm than good.


Order Now
 
 
  Order Now Forgot password?